Today 80 percent of workplaces have social media policies in place.

There’s rarely a week that goes by that we don’t read about someone that loses their job from a careless tweet or mis-post.

Most recently an NFL New Orleans Saints cheerleader, Bailey Davis,  found herself out of a job after she posted a picture of herself on her private Instagram account wearing a lacy one-piece outfit (lingerie). According to the team rules in their code of conduct of the social media policy, it prohibits cheerleaders from appearing nude or partially nude or wearing lingerie on social media.

Agree or disagree with this rule, it’s in the policy that was signed which caused her to lose her job.

What we discuss in Shame Nation book to prevent digital blunders:

  • There is zero expectation of privacy online. Although she assumed her account was private, once it’s online — it risks going public.
  • Never assume you’re among friends. It’s a good assumption someone forwarded this image to a public platform  to copied to a friends. Think the Lindsey Stone case.
  • Social media policies are in a place for a reason. They give businesses leverage if they need a reason to terminate people that are careless online.
  • Today businesses view you as an extension of their brand online — that’s why your responsible digital behavior matters.
  • We’re all a click away from the unemployment line. Think twice — post once.
  • Don’t air your workplace woes.